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Clinical Massage Module 3: Massage Application

HomeCEUConnection.com


Format(s):   Home-study
Discipline(s):   Physical Therapy / Occupational Therapy
Contact Hours:   10
Registration Fee:   $159


Objectives
At the end of this course the professional will be able to: 1. Define justification. 2. Define routine (standing) orders and recognize when they can be used. 3. Identify 8 parts of a history in the healthcare assessment. 4. Recognize components of a discharge summary for inpatients. 5. Recognize PHI stands for protected health information. 6. List 19 landmarks that help identify lack of symmetry. 7. Define anatomic barriers. 8. Identify and differentiate between 4 abnormal end-feels. 9. Recognize 10 components of efficient muscle strength testing. 10. Recognize 7 conditions that a weak, painless contraction may be the result of. 11. Recognize the most common dysfunction of the muscle activation sequence is synergistic dominance. 12. List 6 palpation findings of soft tissue. 13. Recognize a patient should be referred to a physician if any hard, rigid, stiff, painful, or tense areas are noted in the abdomen during palpation of the abdominal viscera. 14. Identify 3 levels of distorted function used when understanding the assessment findings. 15. Recognize an example of resourceful compensation. 16. Recognize an example of an indirect connective tissue technique. 17. Recognize that all the body’s lymph vessels converge into the thoracic duct and the right lymphatic duct. 18. List 8 possible causes of edema. 19. Recognize that deep, narrow-based stroking over the valve system of the veins and lymph vessels from proximal to distal is contraindicated. 20. Recognize 5 general rules about fluids. 21. Recognize when supporting venous return, the therapist should glide no more than 3 inches in the direction toward the heart to take advantage of the valve system in the veins. 22. List 4 contraindications or cautions in lymphatic drainage massage. 23. Identify the main areas of the trunk toward which the fluid will move when performing treatment for swelling of an individual joint area or contusion. 24. Define active release technique. 25. Define trigger point. 26. Recognize in the protocol for mobilization with movement, the joint should be positioned in the least-packed position. 27. Define meridans. 28. Recognize 12 main meridans in the human body. 29. Identify the best positions for assessment of the scalenes. 30. Recognize symptoms of psoas restrictions.

Target Audience
Massage Therapists, Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, Occupational Therapists, and Occupational Therapists Assistants.

Agenda
Massage Therapists, Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, Occupational Therapists, and Occupational Therapists Assistants.

Description
By Sandy Fritz, MS NCTMB; Leon Chaitow, ND, DO; and Glenn M. Hymel EdD, LMT This course utilizes text from the softback textbook by Sandy Fritz, MS NCTMB; Leon Chaitow, ND, DO; and Glenn M. Hymel EdD, LMT, “Clinical Massage in the Healthcare Setting” ©2008. Covering advanced massage therapy skills, this practical resource prepares you to work with medical professionals in a clinical setting, such as a hospital, hospice, long-term care, or other health-related practice. It discusses the many skills you need to succeed in this environment, helping you become a contributing member of an integrated team. Also covered are the essentials of clinical massage, such as indications and contraindications, review of massage methods, range of motion testing, SOAP note documentation, and a massage therapy general protocol. Case studies show how a multidisciplinary approach applies to real-world clients. By coordinating your work with other health professionals, you can enhance patient care in any clinical setting.

Dates and Locations
 
Purchase Address:   Home-study
Location:  
Dates:   01-31-2020 - 01-31-2020, 12:00AM 12:00AM
Instructor(s):  
Accommodation(s):